I Love Latina Women

Breast Cancer Education Toolkits

Women residing in the United States who had singleton births during the study period were included. Counts of singleton term and preterm births by month and race/ethnicity from January 1, 2009, through July 30, 2017 , were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wonder online database. While some argue that Latinas arechoosing lower-paid professions, further education isn’t a panacea, as shown in Figure A. Regardless of their level of educational attainment or their occupation, Latinas are paid less than their white male counterparts.

You may have seen her most recently in the remake of the television series One Day at a Time. She is the first Latina woman and one of few performers to hold an EGOT title, having obtained Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony awards. Maria Isa is a local Twin Cities’ singer, songwriter, actor, rapper, activist and cohost of the podcast Latina Theory.

HBWA is an online community of Hispanic women entrepreneurs, professionals, consultants, executives, inventors and investors located throughout North America, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain interested. Through HBWA you can connect with other Hispanic businesswomen to ​network for customers, capital, special expertise, technology, products, production capacity, or distribution channels. Since 1997, the total number of Hispanic business owners has increased by 82%.

More than 50 years after the passage of the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Latina’s typically earn only 54 cents for every dollar earned by white, non-Hispanic men and must work nearly 23 months to earn what white men earn in 12 months. Latina Equal Pay Day — the day when Latina pay catches up to that of white, non-Hispanic men from the previous year — is being observed likely in November of 2020. Rossina Gallegos facilitates and manages the charitable contribution and the Foundation grant making for Los Angeles and Orange County. She also implements strategies, tactics and programs to maximize the talent and availability of Union Bank employees with the needs of low-and moderate-income communities.

In fact, the pay gap is widest among Latina women with a college education, and widens as higher levels of education are obtained. Latinas with advanced degrees only make two-thirds of the salary of their white male counterparts on average, and a similar discrepancy exists for bachelor’s degree and high-school degree holders. Latinas without a high school degree make 27 percent less than white men with similar educational backgrounds.

However, in Latina culture women are less likely to be intimate outside of a relationship. But take it from the girl who went to UCLA and would always be told “yeah, but you don’t count as Mexican” , that people perceive Latinos to be professionally challenged. Cultural limitations include getting married too young, having children out of wedlock, and having parents that don’t want them to leave their hometown.

Women also hold an unequal share of the nation’s outstanding student-loan debt — two-thirds of the pie, according to the American Association of University Women — despite the fact that fewer women have college degrees. While women are attending college at a higher rate than men (56 percent of four-year-college enrollees were women in 2017), enrollment figures don’t match their share of student loan debt. There are other reasons why women are paid less than men, despite being in similar career fields, holding equivalent degrees, and working in the same parts of the country. For women at the higher end of the earning scale, promotions and raises are often subjective. This can leave them open to discrimination and bias, which can be especially harmful for women of color.

By now, we’ve all heard about the low numbers of American women in science, technology, engineering, and math . Some argue it’s a pipeline issue – that if we can interest more young girls in STEM subjects, the issue will resolve itself over time. After all, the percentage of women in computer science has actually decreased since 1991.

Breast cancer incidence and mortality rates for Hispanic/Latina women are lower than for non-Hispanic white women and non-Hispanic black women . This means Black and African American women were 83 percent as likely as women in the general population to live 5 years beyond their breast cancer diagnosis. White women were 93 percent as likely as women in the general population to live 5 years beyond diagnosis. For those diagnosed from , the 5-year relative survival rate for breast cancer among Black women was 83 percent compared to 93 percent among white women .

Women workers are only 7.3 percent of those in registered apprenticeships.33 Of women who are in apprenticeship programs, less than 10 percent are Hispanic, compared to men in apprenticeships, almost 16 percent of whom identified as Hispanic. Furthermore, women earn less in their apprenticeship programs than men do. Hispanic women earn the least in apprenticeship programs compared to all other groups by racial, ethnic, and gender breakdown.

A key contributing factor is that nearly half of young adult workers (48%) were employed in higher-risk industries in February, compared with 24% of workers overall. Job losses for older workers were also sizable, ranging from 9% to 13%, but less severe than for young adults. The pattern of job losses by age in the COVID-19 recession is generally consistent with the pattern in the Great Recession and in previous recessions. In a Pew Research Center survey conducted April 29-May 5 young adults ages 18 to 29 were also more likely than older Americans to say that they have lost a job or taken a pay cut because of the coronavirus outbreak.

So, over time, breast cancer incidence in the daughters and granddaughters of immigrants tends to become closer to overall incidence in the U.S. However, the daughters and granddaughters of immigrants tend to adopt American lifestyle behaviors.

Of the Latinas participating in the labor force, 32.2% work in the service sector, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This percentage is significantly higher than that of white women, who fall at 20%. Conversely, Latinas are underrepresented in https://friscoinsurancegroup.com/latina-girls-no-more-a-mystery/ various other sectors of the labor force, particularly as business owners. However, Latina entrepreneurship has grown immensely since the start of the 21st century. In 2011, 788,000 Latinas ran their own businesses, representing a 46% increase from 2006.

In Los Angeles, LIFT serves mostly Latino families, 50 percent of whom do not have a legal right to work and nearly 50 percent of whom are monolingual-Spanish-speaking. About half of the LIFT families in New York City are English-language learners. About 90 percent of LIFT parents are female and nearly all are women of color; most have a high school education or less. They work when their home and family responsibilities allow, mostly in retail, hospitality, child care, home health care, and the gig economy and in jobs that generally offer low pay and changing and uncertain hours.

Bonomi AE, Kernic MA, Anderson ML, Cannon EA, Slesnick N. Use of brief tools to measure depressive symptoms in women with a history of intimate partner violence. Rivara FP, Anderson ML, Fishman P, Bonomi AE, Reid RJ, Carrell D, et al.

Her father had been an influential local leader before he had been murdered by Anglo squatters on his land grant. Her stepfather’s later political appointment brought her family to live in Santa Fe where her maternal uncle was a major politician who had played a key role during the state constitutional convention.

They participated in conceptualizing the study aims, adapting the HIV intervention materials, and developing assessment measures and recruitment strategies. The outreach workers were involved in identifying and selecting recruitment sites, conceptualizing recruitment strategies, developing culturally appropriate and appealing recruitment materials , and disseminating recruitment materials. That gap is greater than for black women, who earn 39% less than white men, according to an analysis of U.S.

The employment of Hispanic women was essentially unchanged during the Great Recession. More women than men lost their jobs from February to May, 11.5 million vs. 9.0 million.

Queen Bee, Sisterhood For Women Of Color

Her activism and contributions are frequently labeled as “radical” and used as an excuse to discredit and undermine the importance of her works. Born in Mexico City, raised in Irapuato and Minnesota, she joined her father in Minnesota years after he left their town looking for a better future for his family. Family separation, border consciousness and transnational economy shaped Emilia to become an immigration activist, intersectional feminist and advocate for human rights. Emilia is alumna of the Hubert H. Humphrey Public Policy Fellows Program, the Roy Wilkins Community Fellows and Emerging Leader Fellow with America Votes.

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